The Foodee Projectmodrss – The Foodee Project - Article Feed http://www.thefoodee.com Search our paleo and primal recipes to create your weekly grocery lists. Mon, 15 Jan 2018 21:34:49 +0000 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 hourly 1 CrockPot Pulled Pork http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/636 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/636 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 CrockPot Pulled PorkSo this was my first ever attempt at pulled pork and ever slow cooking anything, who needs a smoker when you have a crock pot. This was absolutely amazing and I have eaten a lot of pulled pork, this with the Zesty BBQ Sauce I used from Son of Grok was amazing. I almost ate 2 lbs of this pork by myself. Hope you enjoy. ]]> Pan Fried Mackerel with Sautéed Cabbage http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/737 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/737 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Pan Fried Mackerel with Sautéed CabbageHowdy Paleo Peeps! It’’s Charles today. So if you have been paying attention to our blog, facebook page or twitter for the past week, you likely know that I just got back from my brother’’s bachelor party in Orange Beach, AL. Otherwise known as the home of the Florabama. We stayed within a decent mullet toss of the place and got our fill of the locals for a few days. My brother decided to book us a fishing trip on Sunday as his “this is what I want to do on my bachelor party” moment. We loaded up the crew to head out for some afternoon fishing. Oh...are you thinking that fishing in the morning is usually better? You’’re right....but let’’s be real here. No way this crew is making a 6am departure. Our goal was Spanish mackerel and maybe some redfish. The fishing was hard that day (for many reasons unrelated to the actual fish). However, we managed to catch about 9 decent mackerel and got some big hits when it came time to fish for reds. Captain Rob felt so sorry for us that he loaded us up with a few extra redfish he had caught that morning after we got back. I’’ve got fresh mackerel in the fridge and trying to figure out what I’’m going to do with it. I’’m hoping to surprise the bride with a tasty creation...but alas it is 5:45 and I’’m still at the office. Yikes! Here is where the inspiration part comes in. I google mackerel recipes to get a few ideas jumping around in my head. BAAAM! One of the top results is a post on mackerel that Mark Sisson made back in June. Grok meets PCF! * Side Note 1- It is great when you search for recipes and find one of your fellow paleo/primal do gooders near the top of the search. The good news is spreading people and spreading fast! ** Side Note 2- Mark Sisson is one cool cat. Julie and I had the chance to visit with him while at the Ancestral Health Symposium...what an amazing human. He was a pleasure to visit with and we owe him big time for posting a link to our book on his website. Keep up the amazing work Mark...and don’’t forget to play!, ]]> http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/0 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/0 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 ]]> http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/0 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/0 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 ]]> Pork Stew with Indian Flavors http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/1047 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/1047 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Pork Stew with Indian FlavorsTired of turkey? Warm up with this rich & hearty pork stew. ]]> Broiled Lobster Tails in Herb Butter http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/3848 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/3848 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Broiled Lobster Tails in Herb ButterMelt butter in medium saucepan over medium heat. Once butter melts, add rosemary, thyme, and white wine and let mixture infuse. About 10 minutes. Meanwhile, line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and arrange lobster tails so the cut side is facing up. Remove herb butter mixture from stovetop and baste lobster tails. If using smoked paprika rub, sprinkle on top of tails now. Turn oven on to broil. Add lobster tails to oven and broil for 2-3 minutes. Remove and turn tails over. Baste with butter mixture and broil for another 2 minutes to get color on the tails. Remove again and turn tails over. Baste with butter and paprika mixture one final time and broil for 1-2 minutes. Garnish with lemon slices and a sprinkle of lemon zest. Serve with Oven Roasted Brussel Sprouts or Asparagus. ]]> Paleo Butternut Squash Lasagna http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/314 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/314 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Paleo Butternut Squash LasagnaI think we’’ve all been there. We think we’’re so incredibly clever for using spaghetti squash as a sub for spaghetti noodles. Then you realize it’’s become a bit Paleo passé,a.k.a. boring. So,let’’s start taking that idea further. We’’ll sub butternut squash for lasagna noodles,and we can call is B.S. Lasagna. The squash around the edges of the pan does actually get crispy,crunchy like lasagna noodles do…and the flavor is definitely there. But other than that,I’’m not going to lie and say,“WOW! It tastes exactly the same!” Though I can’’t remember the last time I had S.A.D. lasagna,so I guess I couldn’’t tell you if it did. Anyway… ]]> Green Chili & Coconut Fish Bake http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/7497 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/7497 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Green Chili & Coconut Fish BakeGreen chili and coconut muffins wrapped with fish fillets and baked. ]]> Creamy Macadamia Shrimp http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/684 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/684 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Creamy Macadamia ShrimpMacadamia nuts are often used as a crispy coating for seafood and that’’s exactly where the inspiration for this recipe came from. We were craving something like macadamia nut crusted shrimp, but we didn’’t want to take the time to dredge each little shrimp in a nutty coating and we didn’’t want to deal with the mess of deep-frying. Occasionally, laziness in the kitchen can be a source of inspiration and leads us to create new dishes that take very little time to make but deliver big flavor. Creamy Macadamia Shrimp is exactly one of these dishes. In twenty minutes or less you’’ll be sitting down to a bowl of shrimp flavored by one of our favorite nuts, the macadamia. If you recall, it made the “10 Foods I Couldn’’t Live Without” list where we mentioned mixing the mild, tropical-tasting nut with blackberries and Greek yogurt. This combo is perfect for breakfast or dessert, but if you want to bring macadamia nuts into your main course too, then Creamy Macadamia Shrimp is a recipe you definitely have to try. A handful of ingredients come together to make a creamy, crunchy, rich sauce that has the slightly sweet flavor of macadamia nuts, the savory bite of shallot and a hint of coconut. It’’s simple to make, but tastes complex. We can imagine serving the shrimp with a side of sautéed greens or on top of steamed cauliflower rice to make it a complete meal. Be generous with the finishing squirt of lime – it will tie all the ingredients together and heighten the flavor of the dish ]]> Thai Steamed Mussels http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/1002 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/1002 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Thai Steamed MusselsI’m no Mark Zuckerberg, but I’m proud to say I killed my own meat today. Yep, I sent some bivalves to their death and the process was quick, easy, and delicious! ]]> Fish Soup in Tomato-Saffron Broth with Broccoli, Cauliflower and Cabbage http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/2018 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/2018 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Fish Soup in Tomato-Saffron Broth with Broccoli, Cauliflower and CabbageAs mentioned in the recent article on sulfur-rich vegetables earlier this week, the best and easiest way to cook sulfur-rich veggies is steaming until “tough-tender.” Top with some form of fat – butter, olive oil, animal – and you have a simple and delicious side dish. Inevitably, however, the day will come when you’ll be staring at a plate of steamed broccoli and butter thinking, there’s got to be more ways to dress up sulfur-rich veggies. ]]> Garlicky Collard Pie http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/2147 http://www.thefoodee.com/recipe/2147 Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:51:38 +0000 Garlicky Collard PieI haven’t posted a recipe on a Friday in a long time, but this week has just been so crazy I really don’t have time for anything more “in-depth” today. But that’s okay, because as recipes go this one is pretty good – especially if you’re a fan of garlic. I have a co-worker who is diabetic and no longer eats things like cereal and pancakes for breakfast, but complains that he is tired of eggs. I can certainly understand that – most cultures have very strong ideas about what constitutes “breakfast food” and many Americans have trouble viewing last night’s leftovers as a viable option for their first meal of the day, even though it’s a good one. I’m certainly guilty of this myself, so I’ve become rather adept at doing more or less creative things with eggs. And when you make a dish like a frittata or a quiche or a soufflé, where eggs are merely the vehicle for the starring ingredients – in this case, the collard greens and garlic – you can really forget you’re eating what is basically an egg dish. At any rate, I love going into my fridge on a Sunday morning and rummaging around to see what I can come up with. I really like frittatas and quiches (and this is sort of a cross between the two) because you can add anything to them – and they’re a great way to make sure you and your family eat lots of leafy greens. I used collard greens here, since that’s what I had on hand, but kale or mustard greens would work really well too. And because I had some beautiful heads of garlic from the farmer’s market (and because Beloved and I love it), I decided to use quite a bit of that, as well; collards are a fairly hearty leafy green and stood up well to the aggressive flavors in the dish. I was really pleased with this, and apparently so was Beloved; he’s been eating the leftovers all week. This would not only make a great brunch (I served it with bacon and fresh grapefruit), but a nice light supper, as well, paired with a good salad. ]]>